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Sussex Police is now required by law to carry out gender pay gap reporting under the ‘Equality Act 2010’.

What is the gender pay gap?

The gender pay gap is a measure of difference between men and women’s average earnings across an organisation. It is expressed as a percentage of men’s earnings. These figures take into consideration both part-time and full-time employees.

Having a gender pay gap does not mean we have inequalities of pay between males and females who are doing the same work.

Gender pay gap reporting can help us assesses the proportion of men and women at all levels of seniority within an organisation.

Our results

The report shows the overall gender pay gap figures of the following:

  • Gender pay gap (mean and median)
  • Gender bonus gap (mean and median)
  • Proportion of men and women in each quartile of the organisation’s pay structure
  • Proportion of men and women receiving bonuses.

The figures are based on a data snapshot taken at 31 March 2017.

As well as reporting our gender pay gap figures, we are also reporting figures for officers and staff separately as this helps us to understand our figures better.

Officers and staff gender pay gap graphic

Officers gender pay gap graphic

Staff gender pay gap graphic

Summary

Our figures, as split for officers and staff, reflect that we may need to take different action to improve the gap for officers compared with staff, such as, work to increase the numbers of females progressing to senior officer roles.

Like other forces, particularly those making firearms payments, our figures show a bonus pay gap which can be attributed to the low number of females currently in firearms.

Looking to the future

We continue to seek to improve our gender pay gap, and we will use this data to understand where we need to focus our efforts in order to close the gender pay gap in the future. We are addressing the gap in a number of ways, which include looking at leadership, culture and diversity within the organisation.

Leadership and culture: in 2017, alongside Surrey Police, we became the inaugural Thematic Champions commit to the ‘HeForShe’ movement for gender equality. This United Nations movement calls upon men and boys to become agents of change for gender equality in the world, and to take action against the negative inequalities faced by women and girls globally every day. Our Chief Constable Giles York has spoken on a number of occasions, of our commitment, most notably at the 2017 Senior Women in Policing Conference , hosted by Sussex Police with other UK police forces joining the initiative. We have pledged our commitment to closing the gender gap in senior leadership roles, and to continue to combat domestic abuse.

Diversity: We are committed to creating a workforce who are reflective of the communities we serve, including gender, nationality, ethnicity, disability, and sexual orientation. We have various staff networks in place which help us focus on how we positively change our staff and organisation. Some of the staff networks we have include: Enable – the Sussex Police Disability and Carers Association, Evolve – the Gender Equality Network, Lesbian Gay Bi-sexual and Trans (LGBT) network, Proud Allies – supporting LGBT equality in the workplace, Race Equality Network, and the Interfaith Forum. We continue to identify and reduce barriers that may put off or discourage a diverse range of applicants for roles within Sussex Police.

Our Commitment: whilst our average pay gap compares favourably with the national average we continue to seek to improve. We are working with partner agencies such as ‘Working Families’ to help us consider and overcome barriers to progression, which may result from balancing work hours with family commitments. Although we continue to develop in this area, a number of positive improvements are being made because of the proactivity of our staff challenging us and making a difference; this includes the set-up of a job share register, as well as the creation of maternity buddies, and the development of ‘Keeping in Touch’ events for people who are on maternity, shared parental, adoption, parental, paternity or parenting partner leave.

We will continue to work on reducing our gender pay gap, and will report our findings on an annual basis.

Some improvements may take longer to implement, but we are committed to making improvements and working with other Forces to share learning and ideas.

Gender pay gap

A comparison between mean and median hourly pay for all women and men within the force. Both full time and part time employees.

The median gender pay gap

This is the difference between the median (middle) value of hourly pay rates (when ordered from lowest to highest) for all men in an organisation, and the median value of hourly pay rates for all women, expressed as a percentage of the median hourly rate for men.

The mean gender pay gap

This is the difference between the mean (average) hourly pay rate for all men in an organisation, and the mean hourly pay rate for all women, expressed as a percentage of the mean hourly rate for men.

The median bonus pay gap

This is the difference between the median (middle) value of bonuses (when ordered from lowest to highest) for all men in an organisation and the median value of bonuses for all women, as a percentage of the median bonus for men.

The mean bonus pay gap

This is the difference between the mean (average) value of bonuses for all men in an organisation and the mean value of bonuses for all women, expressed as a percentage of the mean bonus for men.

25% (quartile) pay distribution

The proportion of men and women in each 25% (quartile) of an employer’s pay structure.

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